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J Infect Dis. 2015 May 15;211(10):1677-85. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiu653. Epub 2014 Nov 26.

Perfluorocarbon emulsion therapy attenuates pneumococcal infection in sickle cell mice.

Author information

1
Department of Infection, Immunity, and Inflammation, University of Leicester, United Kingdom High Ministry of Education Al-Farabi College, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
2
Department of Infection, Immunity, and Inflammation, University of Leicester, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Impaired immunity and tissue hypoxia-ischemia are strongly linked with Streptococcus pneumoniae pathogenesis in patients with sickle cell anemia. Perfluorocarbon emulsions (PFCEs) have high O2-dissolving capacity and can alleviate tissue hypoxia. Here, we evaluate the effects of intravenous PFCE therapy in transgenic sickle cell (HbSS) mice infected with S. pneumoniae. HbSS and C57BL/6 (control) mice intravenously infected with S. pneumoniae were treated intravenously with PFCE or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and then managed in either air/O2 (FiO2 proportion, 50%; hereafter referred to as the PFCE-O2 and PBS-O2 groups) or air only (hereafter, the PFCE-air and PBS-air groups) gas mixtures. Lungs were processed for leukocyte and bacterial counts and cytokine measurements. HbSS mice developed severe pneumococcal infection significantly faster than C57BL/6 mice (Kaplan-Maier analysis, P < .05). PFCE-O2-treated HbSS mice had significantly better survival at 72 hours than HBSS mice treated with PFCE-air, PBS-O2, or PBS-air (P < .05). PFCE-O2-treated HbSS mice also had significantly lower pulmonary leukocyte counts, lower interleukin 1β and interferon γ levels, and higher interleukin 10 levels than PFCE-air-treated HbSS mice. Clearance of S. pneumoniae from lungs of HbSS mice or C57BL/6 mice was not altered by PFCE treatment. Improved survival of PFCE-O₂-treated HbSS mice infected with S. pneumoniae is associated with altered pulmonary inflammation but not enhanced bacterial clearance.

KEYWORDS:

Streptococcus pneumoniae; anemia; antisickling agents

PMID:
25429101
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiu653
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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