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PLoS One. 2014 Nov 26;9(11):e112802. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0112802. eCollection 2014.

Mechanistic insight into the TH1-biased immune response to recombinant subunit vaccines delivered by probiotic bacteria-derived outer membrane vesicles.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, United States.
2
School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, United States.
3
Department of Animal Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, United States.
4
College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, United States.
5
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, United States; School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, United States.

Abstract

Recombinant subunit vaccine engineering increasingly focuses on the development of more effective delivery platforms. However, current recombinant vaccines fail to sufficiently stimulate protective adaptive immunity against a wide range of pathogens while remaining a cost effective solution to global health challenges. Taking an unorthodox approach to this fundamental immunological challenge, we isolated the TLR-targeting capability of the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 bacteria (EcN) by engineering bionanoparticlate antigen carriers derived from EcN outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Exogenous model antigens expressed by these modified bacteria as protein fusions with the bacterial enterotoxin ClyA resulted in their display on the surface of the carrier OMVs. Vaccination with the engineered EcN OMVs in a BALB/c mouse model, and subsequent mechanism of action analysis, established the EcN OMV's ability to induce self-adjuvanted robust and protective humoral and T(H)1-biased cellular immunity to model antigens. This finding appears to be strain-dependent, as OMV antigen carriers similarly engineered from a standard K12 E. coli strain derivative failed to generate a comparably robust antigen-specific TH1 bias. The results demonstrate that unlike traditional subunit vaccines, these biomolecularly engineered "pathogen-like particles" derived from traditionally overlooked, naturally potent immunomodulators have the potential to effectively couple recombinant antigens with meaningful immunity in a broadly applicable fashion.

PMID:
25426709
PMCID:
PMC4245113
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0112802
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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