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Mol Biol Evol. 2015 Feb;32(2):456-71. doi: 10.1093/molbev/msu315. Epub 2014 Nov 24.

Evolution of the insect desaturase gene family with an emphasis on social Hymenoptera.

Author information

1
School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University.
2
School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University elizabeth.cash@asu.edu.

Abstract

Desaturase genes are essential for biological processes, including lipid metabolism, cell signaling, and membrane fluidity regulation. Insect desaturases are particularly interesting for their role in chemical communication, and potential contribution to speciation, symbioses, and sociality. Here, we describe the acyl-CoA desaturase gene families of 15 insects, with a focus on social Hymenoptera. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that the insect desaturases represent an ancient gene family characterized by eight subfamilies that differ strongly in their degree of conservation and frequency of gene gain and loss. Analyses of genomic organization showed that five of these subfamilies are represented in a highly microsyntenic region conserved across holometabolous insect taxa, indicating an ancestral expansion during early insect evolution. In three subfamilies, ants exhibit particularly large expansions of genes. Despite these expansions, however, selection analyses showed that desaturase genes in all insect lineages are predominantly undergoing strong purifying selection. Finally, for three expanded subfamilies, we show that ants exhibit variation in gene expression between species, and more importantly, between sexes and castes within species. This suggests functional differentiation of these genes and a role in the regulation of reproductive division of labor in ants. The dynamic pattern of gene gain and loss of acyl-CoA desaturases in ants may reflect changes in response to ecological diversification and an increased demand for chemical signal variability. This may provide an example of how gene family expansions can contribute to lineage-specific adaptations through structural and regulatory changes acting in concert to produce new adaptive phenotypes.

KEYWORDS:

chemical communication; desaturase genes; gene duplication; social Hymenoptera

PMID:
25425561
PMCID:
PMC4298175
DOI:
10.1093/molbev/msu315
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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