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Am J Transplant. 2015 Jan;15(1):265-73. doi: 10.1111/ajt.13004. Epub 2014 Nov 25.

Does financial compensation for living kidney donation change willingness to donate?

Author information

1
Center for Healthcare Studies, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; Comprehensive Transplant Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

The potential use of financial compensation to increase living kidney donation rates remains controversial in potentially introducing undue inducement of vulnerable populations to donate. This cross-sectional study assessed amounts of financial compensation that would generate motivation and an undue inducement to donate to family/friends or strangers. Individuals leaving six Departments of Motor Vehicles were surveyed. Of the 210 participants who provided verbal consent (94% participation rate), respondents' willingness to donate would not change (70%), or would increase (29%) with compensation. Median lowest amounts of financial compensation for which participants would begin to consider donating a kidney were $5000 for family/friends, and $10,000 for strangers; respondents reporting $0 for family/friends (52%) or strangers (26%) were excluded from analysis. Median lowest amounts of financial compensation for which participants could no longer decline (perceive an undue inducement) were $50,000 for family/friends, and $100,000 for strangers; respondents reporting $0 for family/friends (44%) or strangers (23%) were excluded from analysis. The two most preferred forms of compensation included: direct payment of money (61%) and paid leave (21%). The two most preferred uses of compensation included: paying off debt (38%) and paying nonmedical expenses associated with the transplant (29%). Findings suggest tolerance for, but little practical impact of, financial compensation. Certain compensation amounts could motivate the public to donate without being perceived as an undue inducement.

KEYWORDS:

donors and donation: living; ethics; ethics and public policy; health services and outcomes research; kidney transplantation; kidney transplantation: living donor; nephrology; organ sale/trade; social sciences; survey

PMID:
25425398
DOI:
10.1111/ajt.13004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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