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PLoS One. 2014 Nov 25;9(11):e112733. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0112733. eCollection 2014.

Coping with breast cancer: a meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Department of Clinical Neuroscience & Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The primary aim of this study was to examine the associations between different types of coping and psychological well-being and physical health among women with breast cancer. A second aim was to explore the potential moderating influences of situational and measurement factors on the associations between coping and psychological well-being and physical health.

METHODS:

On 14 February 2011, a literature search was made for articles published in the PubMed and PsycINFO databases before January 2010. On 5 September 2013, a repeated literature search was made for articles published before May 2013. In the final analyses, 78 studies with 11 948 participants were included.

RESULTS:

Efforts to facilitate adaptation to stress, such as Acceptance and Positive Reappraisal, were related to higher well-being and health. Disengagement and avoidance types of coping were associated with lower well-being and health. The analyses indicated that, in several circumstances, coping effectiveness was dependent on cancer stage, treatment, disease duration, and type of coping measure.

CONCLUSIONS:

Use of coping targeting adjustment and avoiding use of disengagement forms of coping were related to better psychological well-being and physical health. Adaptive strategies and avoiding disengagement forms of coping seemed particularly beneficial for women undergoing treatment.

PMID:
25423095
PMCID:
PMC4244095
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0112733
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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