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J Sch Violence. 2014;13(1):125-145.

Protective Factors Against the Impact of School Bullying Perpetration and Victimization on Young Adult Externalizing and Internalizing Problems.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia, and Centre for Adolescent Health, Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
2
School of Psychology, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia.
3
3DL Partnership, School of Social Work, University of Washington, and Social Development Research Group, School of Social Work, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Abstract

School-based bullying perpetration and victimization is common worldwide and has profound impacts on student behavior and mental health. However, few studies have examined young adult outcomes of bullying perpetration or victimization. Research on factors that protect students who have bullied or been bullied is also lacking. This study examined young adult externalizing and internalizing problems (aged 18-19 years) and adolescent protective factors related to self-reported bullying perpetration and victimization among over 650 Victorians aged 16-17 years. Opportunities for prosocial involvement in the family lessened subsequent involvement in nonviolent antisocial behavior, as an outcome of prior bullying. High academic performance and having strategies to cope with stress reduced young adult depressive symptoms for participants who had been victims of bullying. The implications for bullying prevention and early intervention programs are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

bullying; externalizing problems; internalizing problems; longitudinal study; protective factors; young people

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