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J Am Soc Hypertens. 2014 Oct;8(10):724-31. doi: 10.1016/j.jash.2014.08.002. Epub 2014 Aug 14.

Use of the plasma triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio to identify cardiovascular disease in hypertensive subjects.

Author information

1
Hospital Universitario General San Martín, La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: salazarlandea@gmail.com.
2
Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
3
Hospital Universitario General San Martín, La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
4
Hospital Municipal de Rauch, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
5
Hospital Universitario General San Martín, La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
6
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.

Abstract

This analysis evaluated the hypothesis that the plasma triglyceride (TG)/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration ratio can help identify patients with essential hypertension who are insulin-resistant, with the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk profile associated with that defect. Data from a community-based study developed between 2003 and 2012 were used to compare CVD risk factors and outcome. Plasma TG/HDL-C cut-points of 2.5 (women) and 3.5 (men) subdivided normotensive (n = 574) and hypertensive (n = 373) subjects into "high" and "low" risk groups. Metabolic syndrome criteria (MetS) were also used to identify "high" and "low" risk groups. The baseline cardio-metabolic profile was significantly more adverse in 2003 in "high" risk subgroups, irrespective of BP classification or definition of risk (TG/HDL-C ratio vs. MetS criteria). Crude incidence of combined CVD events increased across risk groups, ranging from 1.9 in normotensive-low TG/HDL-C subjects to 19.9 in hypertensive-high TG/HDL-C ratio individuals (P for trends <.001). Adjusted hazard ratios for CVD events also increased with both hypertension and TG/HDL-C. Comparable findings were seen when CVD outcome was predicted by MetS criteria. The TG/HDL-C concentration ratio and the MetS criteria identify to a comparable degree hypertensive subjects who are at greatest cardio-metabolic risk and develop significantly more CVD.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular outcome; TG/HDL-C ratio; hypertension; metabolic syndrome

PMID:
25418494
DOI:
10.1016/j.jash.2014.08.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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