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Cell Mol Immunol. 2015 Nov;12(6):700-7. doi: 10.1038/cmi.2014.111. Epub 2014 Nov 24.

Platelets promote allergic asthma through the expression of CD154.

Tian J1,2, Zhu T3, Liu J2, Guo Z2, Cao X1,2.

Author information

1
Institute of Immunology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China.
2
National Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology & Institute of Immunology, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.
3
Department of Respiration, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Region, Shenyang, China.

Abstract

Platelet activation is associated with multiple immune responses and the pathogenesis of various immune-related diseases. However, the exact role and the underlying mechanism of platelets in the progression of allergic asthma remain largely unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that during antigen sensitization, platelets can be activated by ovalbumin (OVA) aerosol via the upregulation of CD154 (CD40L) expression. Platelet transfer promoted allergic asthma progression by inducing more severe leukocyte infiltration and lung inflammation, elevated IgE production and strengthened T helper 2 (Th2) responses in asthma-induced mice. Accordingly, platelet depletion compromised allergic asthma progression. Cd154-deficient platelets failed to promote asthma development, indicating the requirement of CD154 for platelets to promote asthma progression. The mechanistic study showed that platelets inhibited the induction of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells both in vivo and in vitro at least partially through CD154, providing an explanation for the increase of Th2 responses by platelet transfer. Our study reveals the previously unknown role of platelet CD154 in the promotion of asthma progression by polarizing Th2 responses and inhibiting regulatory T-cell generation and thus provides a potential clue for allergic disease interventions.

PMID:
25418472
PMCID:
PMC4716619
DOI:
10.1038/cmi.2014.111
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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