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Arthritis Rheumatol. 2015 Mar;67(3):645-55. doi: 10.1002/art.38969.

Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde adducts and anti-malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis.

Author information

1
VA Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System, Omaha, Nebraska, and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) adducts are a product of oxidative stress associated with tolerance loss in several disease states. This study was undertaken to investigate the presence of MAA adducts and circulating anti-MAA antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

METHODS:

Synovial tissue from patients with RA and patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were examined for the presence of MAA-modified and citrullinated proteins. Anti-MAA antibody isotypes were measured in RA patients (n = 1,720) and healthy controls (n = 80) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antigen-specific anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) were measured in RA patients using a multiplex antigen array. Anti-MAA isotype concentrations were compared in a subset of RA patients (n = 80) and matched healthy controls (n = 80). Associations of anti-MAA antibody isotypes with disease characteristics, including ACPA positivity, were examined in all RA patients.

RESULTS:

Expression of MAA adducts was increased in RA synovial tissue compared to OA synovial tissue, and colocalization with citrullinated proteins was found. Increased levels of anti-MAA antibody isotypes were observed in RA patients compared to controls (P < 0.001). Among RA patients, anti-MAA antibody isotypes were associated with seropositivity for ACPAs and rheumatoid factor (P < 0.001) in addition to select measures of disease activity. Higher anti-MAA antibody concentrations were associated with a greater number of positive antigen-specific ACPA analytes (expressed at high titer) (P < 0.001) and a higher ACPA score (P < 0.001), independent of other covariates.

CONCLUSION:

MAA adduct formation is increased in RA and appears to result in robust antibody responses that are strongly associated with ACPAs. These results support speculation that MAA formation may be a cofactor that drives tolerance loss, resulting in the autoimmune responses characteristic of RA.

PMID:
25417811
PMCID:
PMC5469548
DOI:
10.1002/art.38969
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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