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Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2015 Jan;17(1):529. doi: 10.1007/s11920-014-0529-x.

Psychopharmacology in cancer.

Author information

1
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, P.O. Box 301402, Unit 1454, Houston, TX, 77230-1402, USA, smthekdi@mdanderson.org.

Abstract

Depression, anxiety, delirium, and other psychiatric symptoms are highly prevalent in the cancer setting, and pharmacological intervention is an important component in the overall psychosocial care of the patient. Psychopharmacology is also used as a primary or adjuvant treatment for the management of cancer-related symptoms stemming from the disease itself and/or its treatment, including sleep disturbance, loss of appetite, neuropathic pain, nausea, fatigue, and hot flashes. Psychiatrists, oncologists, and palliative care physicians working as members of a multidisciplinary team have the opportunity to target multiple symptoms that negatively affect a patient's quality of life with the strategic use of psychotropic medications when deemed appropriate. This article aims to review the indications for use of antidepressants, psychostimulants, anxiolytics, antipsychotics, and mood stabilizers in oncology. An updated review of the relevant literature is discussed and referenced in each section.

PMID:
25417593
DOI:
10.1007/s11920-014-0529-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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