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J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 2014 Nov;2014(49):228-35. doi: 10.1093/jncimonographs/lgu019.

Adolescent and young adult cancer survival.

Author information

  • 1Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DRL, AWS, MRS), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (NLS), National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. lewisde@mail.nih.gov.
  • 2Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DRL, AWS, MRS), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (NLS), National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

Abstract

Adolescent and young adults (AYAs) face challenges in having their cancers recognized, diagnosed, treated, and monitored. Monitoring AYA cancer survival is of interest because of the lack of improvement in outcome previously documented for these patients as compared with younger and older patient outcomes. AYA patients 15-39 years old, diagnosed during 2000-2008 with malignant cancers were selected from the SEER 17 registries data. Selected cancers were analyzed for incidence and five-year relative survival by histology, stage, and receptor subtypes. Hazard ratios were estimated for cancer death risk among younger and older ages relative to the AYA group. AYA survival was worse for female breast cancer (regardless of estrogen receptor status), acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AYA survival for AML was lowest for a subtype associated with a mutation of the nucleophosmin 1 gene (NPM1). AYA survival for breast cancer and leukemia remain poor as compared with younger and older survivors. Research is needed to address disparities and improve survival in this age group.

PMID:
25417236
PMCID:
PMC4841167
DOI:
10.1093/jncimonographs/lgu019
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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