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Nurs Ethics. 2015 Nov;22(7):754-64. doi: 10.1177/0969733014551376. Epub 2014 Nov 20.

The significance of small things for dignity in psychiatric care.

Author information

1
Stord/Haugesund University College, Norway frode.skorpen@hsh.no.
2
Stord/Haugesund University College, Norway.
3
University of Stavanger, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study is based on the ontological assumption about human interdependence, and also on earlier research, which has shown that patients in psychiatric hospitals and their relatives experience suffering and indignity.

AIM:

The aim of this study is to explore the experience of patients and relatives regarding respect for dignity following admission to a psychiatric unit.

RESEARCH DESIGN:

The methodological approach is a phenomenological hermeneutic method.

PARTICIPANTS AND RESEARCH CONTEXT:

This study is based on qualitative interviews conducted with six patients at a psychiatric hospital and five relatives of patients who experienced psychosis.

ETHICAL CONSIDERATION:

Permission was given by the Regional Committee for Medical Research Ethics in Western Norway, the Norwegian Data Protection Agency and all wards within the hospital in which the patients were interviewed.

FINDINGS:

The analysis revealed one main theme: 'The significance of small things for experiencing dignity' and four subthemes described as follows - 'to be conscious of small things', 'being conscious of what one says', 'being met' and 'to be aware of personal chemistry'.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION:

Staff members seem not to give enough attention to the importance of these small things. Staff members need to explore this phenomenon systematically and expand their own understanding of it.

KEYWORDS:

Care; dignity; interdependence; patients; psychosis; relatives; small things

PMID:
25416719
DOI:
10.1177/0969733014551376
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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