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Cell Biochem Biophys. 2015 May;72(1):83-7. doi: 10.1007/s12013-014-0408-4.

Clinical Effectiveness of Scapulothoracic Joint Control Training Exercises on Shoulder Joint Dysfunction.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Xuzhou Central Hospital, Xuzhou, 221009, Jiangsu Province, China.
2
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Xuzhou Central Hospital, Xuzhou, 221009, Jiangsu Province, China. chenwei2339@163.com.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the clinical effectiveness of scapulothoracic joint control training exercises on shoulder joint dysfunction. Forty patients with traumatic shoulder pain and joint dysfunction were randomized into the treatment or control group. Standard rehabilitation interventions included glenohumeral joint mobilization techniques, ultrasound therapy, traditional Chinese medicine, interference current therapy, and other comprehensive interventions. Patients received scapulothoracic joint control training exercises, including active and passive motions of the scapulothoracic joints, peri-joint muscle exercise, and joint stability exercises for 1 month. Patient status was evaluated by Constant-Murley scales before and after the prescribed interventions. The pain conditions, daily activities, range of movement, strength tests and total scores were significantly improved compared to prior treatment. Moreover, improvements in pain, daily activities, scope of activities, and total scores for patients in the treatment group were statistically significant when compared to the control group (P < 0.05). However, there was no inter-group difference in strength testing. The combination of standard rehabilitation interventions and scapulothoracic joint control training exercises are an effective treatment of the shoulder joint dysfunction. Moreover, the pain outcomes, scope of activities, and total scores were better in the treatment group.

KEYWORDS:

Control training exercises; Scapula; Scapulothoracic joints; Shoulder joint

PMID:
25416584
DOI:
10.1007/s12013-014-0408-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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