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Public Health Nutr. 2015 Aug;18(12):2172-82. doi: 10.1017/S1368980014002523. Epub 2014 Nov 20.

Pre-pregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

Author information

1
1Department of Orthopedics,Minhang Hospital,Fudan University,Shanghai,People's Republic of China.
2
2Nestlé Research Center,Beijing,People's Republic of China.
3
3China Astronaut Research and Training Center,Department of Space Food and Nutrition,Beijing,People's Republic of China.
4
4School of Public Health,Peking University Health Science Center,38 Xueyuan Road,Haidian District,Beijing 100191,People's Republic of China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the association of gestational weight gain (GWG) or pre-pregnancy BMI with postpartum weight retention (PPWR).

DESIGN:

Meta-analysis.

SETTING:

PubMed, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, Current Contents Connects and Biosis Previews were used to search articles.

SUBJECTS:

Publications that described the influence of pre-pregnancy BMI or GWG on PPWR.

RESULTS:

Seventeen studies that satisfied the eligibility criteria were included in the analyses. Women with inadequate and excessive GWG had significantly lower mean PPWR of -2·14 kg (95 % CI -2·43, -1·85 kg) and higher PPWR of 3·21 kg (95 % CI 2·79, 3·62 kg), respectively, than women with adequate GWG. When postpartum time spans were stratified into 1-3 months, 3-6 months, 6-12 months, 12-36 months and ≥15 years, the association between inadequate GWG and PPWR faded over time and became insignificant (-1·42 kg; 95 % CI -3·08, 0·24 kg) after ≥15 years. However, PPWR in women with excess GWG exhibited a U-shaped trend; that is, a decline during the early postpartum time span (year 1) and then an increase in the following period. Meta-analysis of qualitative studies showed a significant relationship between excessive GWG and higher PPWR risk (OR=2·08; 95 % CI 1·60, 2·70). Moreover, meta-analysis of pre-pregnancy BMI on PPWR indicated that mean PPWR decreased with increasing BMI group.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that GWG, rather than pre-pregnancy BMI, determines the shorter- or longer-term PPWR.

KEYWORDS:

BMI; Gestational weight gain; Postpartum weight retention

PMID:
25411780
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980014002523
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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