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Lupus. 2015 May;24(6):606-12. doi: 10.1177/0961203314559628. Epub 2014 Nov 18.

Lack of association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and cervical human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus.

Author information

1
Systemic Autoimmune Diseases Research Unit, HGR #36-CIBIOR, IMSS, Puebla, Mexico Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Puebla, Mexico.
2
Systemic Autoimmune Diseases Research Unit, HGR #36-CIBIOR, IMSS, Puebla, Mexico.
3
Laboratorios Clínicos de Puebla, Puebla, Mexico.
4
Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Oriente (CIBIOR), Molecular Biology and Virology Laboratory, Metepec, Puebla, Mexico.
5
Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Medicine School, Research and Posgraduate, Studies Secretary, Puebla, Mexico.
6
Department of Microbiology and Virology, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Puebla, Mexico.
7
State Research Department, Research Unit, IMSS, Puebla, Mexico.
8
Department of Autoimmune Diseases, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain rcervera@clinic.cat.

Abstract

Our objective was to evaluate whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with cervical human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in women with SLE. This is a cross-sectional study of 67 women with SLE. A structured questionnaire was administered to ascertain the possible risk factors associated with cervical HPV infection. A gynaecological evaluation and cervical cytology screening were made. HPV detection and genotyping was made by PCR and linear array assay. Serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D levels were quantified by chemiluminescence immunoassay. Mean age and disease duration were 44.8 ± 10.6 and 42.5 ± 11.8 years, respectively. Demographic characteristics were similar in patients with and without deficiency (<20 ng/ml and ≥20 ng/ml). There were 28.4% of women with cervical HPV infection and 68.4% had high-risk HPV infections. Patients with 25 hydroxyvitamin D levels <20 ng/ml had a higher prevalence of cervical HPV infection than those with levels ≥20 ng/ml (30.7% vs. 25.8%; p = 0.72). We found no significant difference when high-risk HPV infection was evaluated (36.8% vs. 31.5%; p = 0.73). In conclusion, women with SLE have a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and cervical HPV infection. However, we found no association between vitamin D deficiency and cervical HPV.

KEYWORDS:

Cervical human papillomavirus infection; systemic lupus erythematosus; vitamin D

PMID:
25411259
DOI:
10.1177/0961203314559628
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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