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Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2015 Nov;272(11):3233-9. doi: 10.1007/s00405-014-3395-6. Epub 2014 Nov 20.

Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials and subjective visual vertical testing in patients with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency.

Author information

1
Audiology Unit, ENT Department, Menoufiya University, Shibin Al Kawm, Al Minufiyah, Egypt. sanyelbhaa@yahoo.com.
2
Internal Medicine Department, Suez Canal University, Ismaileya, Egypt.

Abstract

Otolith function in subjects with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is investigated through vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) and subjective visual vertical (SVV) testing. The study group included 62 patients with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency (30 females, 32 males), with age range 24-56 years (40.6 ± 9.1). The control group included 44 healthy volunteers of similar age and gender distribution. The entire study group had: (1) serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D <30 ng/ml; (2) normal bone mineral density as indicated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry with T-score >-1; (3) normal middle ear function; (4) Age is ≤60 years. All subjects enrolled in the current study underwent audiovestibular evaluation consisting of pure-tone audiometry, immittancemetry, cervical VEMP (cVEMP), ocular VEMP (oVEMP), and SSV. The entire control group had normal cVEMP, two subjects had abnormal oVEMP. Thirty-three subjects (53%) in the study group had abnormal oVEMP and 31 subjects (50%) had abnormal cVEMP. Forty-one (66%) had abnormal VEMP when abnormal VEMP was considered as either abnormal oVEMP or cVEMP. The entire control and study groups had normal SSV test results. Vitamin D deficiency may be associated with development of otolith dysfunction affecting both the utricle and saccule. This was suggested by the high prevalence of abnormal ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP) and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP) in the study group.

KEYWORDS:

Hypovitaminosis D; Otoconia; Otolith; Vestibular disorder

PMID:
25411075
DOI:
10.1007/s00405-014-3395-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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