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J Virol. 2015 Feb;89(3):1512-22. doi: 10.1128/JVI.02950-14. Epub 2014 Nov 19.

Construction and evaluation of novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vaccine vectors.

Author information

1
Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
2
Theoretical Biology and Biophysics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the New Mexico Consortium, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA.
3
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA.
4
Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Boston, Massachusetts, USA dbarouch@bidmc.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. The phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. Here we describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.

IMPORTANCE:

Although there have been substantial efforts in the development of vaccine vectors from human and chimpanzee adenoviruses, far less is known about rhesus monkey adenoviruses. In this report, we describe the isolation and vectorization of three novel rhesus monkey adenoviruses. These vectors exhibit virologic and immunologic characteristics that make them attractive as potential candidate vaccine vectors for both HIV-1 and other pathogens.

PMID:
25410856
PMCID:
PMC4300752
DOI:
10.1128/JVI.02950-14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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