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PLoS One. 2014 Nov 19;9(11):e113400. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0113400. eCollection 2014.

Processing deficits of motion of contrast-modulated gratings in anisometropic amblyopia.

Author information

1
CAS Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Diseases, and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, People's Republic of China; Research and Treatment Center of Amblyopia and Strabismus, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, People's Republic of China.
2
Research and Treatment Center of Amblyopia and Strabismus, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, People's Republic of China.
3
Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, People's Republic of China.
4
CAS Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Diseases, and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, People's Republic of China; Research and Treatment Center of Amblyopia and Strabismus, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, People's Republic of China; State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

Several studies have indicated substantial processing deficits for static second-order stimuli in amblyopia. However, less is known about the perception of second-order moving gratings. To investigate this issue, we measured the contrast sensitivity for second-order (contrast-modulated) moving gratings in seven anisometropic amblyopes and ten normal controls. The measurements were performed with non-equated carriers and a series of equated carriers. For comparison, the sensitivity for first-order motion and static second-order stimuli was also measured. Most of the amblyopic eyes (AEs) showed reduced sensitivity for second-order moving gratings relative to their non-amblyopic eyes (NAEs) and the dominant eyes (CEs) of normal control subjects, even when the detectability of the noise carriers was carefully controlled, suggesting substantial processing deficits of motion of contrast-modulated gratings in anisometropic amblyopia. In contrast, the non-amblyopic eyes of the anisometropic amblyopes were relatively spared. As a group, NAEs showed statistically comparable performance to CEs. We also found that contrast sensitivity for static second-order stimuli was strongly impaired in AEs and part of the NAEs of anisometropic amblyopes, consistent with previous studies. In addition, some amblyopes showed impaired performance in perception of static second-order stimuli but not in that of second-order moving gratings. These results may suggest a dissociation between the processing of static and moving second-order gratings in anisometropic amblyopia.

PMID:
25409477
PMCID:
PMC4237427
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0113400
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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