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Addiction. 2015 Apr;110(4):669-77. doi: 10.1111/add.12807. Epub 2014 Dec 22.

First- versus second-generation electronic cigarettes: predictors of choice and effects on urge to smoke and withdrawal symptoms.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, University of East London, Water Lane, Stratford, London, E15 4LZ.

Abstract

AIMS:

To (1) estimate predictors of first- versus second-generation electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) choice; and (2) determine whether a second-generation device was (i) superior for reducing urge to smoke and withdrawal symptoms (WS) and (ii) associated with enhanced positive subjective effects.

DESIGN:

Mixed-effects experimental design. Phase 1: reason for e-cigarette choice was assessed via questionnaire. Phase 2: participants were allocated randomly to first- or second-generation e-cigarette condition. Urge to smoke and WS were measured before and 10 minutes after taking 10 e-cigarette puffs.

SETTING:

University of East London, UK.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 97 smokers (mean age 26; standard deviation 8.7; 54% female).

MEASUREMENTS:

Single-item urge to smoke scale to assess craving and the Mood and Physical Symptoms Scale (MPSS) to assess WS. Subjective effects included: satisfaction, hit, 'felt like smoking' and 'would use to stop smoking' (yes versus no response).

FINDINGS:

Equal numbers chose each device, but none of the predictor variables (gender, age, tobacco dependence, previous e-cigarette use) accounted for choice. Only baseline urge to smoke/WS predicted urge to smoke/WS 10 minutes after use (B =0.38; P <0.001 and B =0.53; P <0.001). E-cigarette device was not a significant predictor. Those using the second-generation device were more likely to report satisfaction and use in a quit attempt (χ(2)  = 12.10, P =0.001 and χ(2)  = 5.53, P =0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

First- and second-generation electronic cigarettes appear to be similarly effective in reducing urges to smoke during abstinence, but second-generation devices appear to be more satisfying to users.

KEYWORDS:

ENDS; Electronic cigarette; urge to smoke; withdrawal symptoms

PMID:
25407505
DOI:
10.1111/add.12807
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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