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BMJ Open. 2014 Nov 18;4(11):e005294. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005294.

Health literacy issues in the care of Chinese American immigrants with diabetes: a qualitative study.

Author information

1
Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, School of Nursing, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Research Centre on Heart, Brain, Hormone and Healthy Aging, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
2
School of Social Work, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate why first-generation Chinese immigrants with diabetes have difficulty obtaining, processing and understanding diabetes related information despite the existence of translated materials and translators.

DESIGN:

This qualitative study employed purposive sampling. Six focus groups and two individual interviews were conducted. Each group discussion lasted approximately 90 min and was guided by semistructured and open-ended questions.

SETTING:

Data were collected in two community health centres and one elderly retirement village in Los Angeles, California.

PARTICIPANTS:

29 Chinese immigrants aged ≥45 years and diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for at least 1 year.

RESULTS:

Eight key themes were found to potentially affect Chinese immigrants' capacity to obtain, communicate, process and understand diabetes related health information and consequently alter their decision making in self-care. Among the themes, three major categories emerged: cultural factors, structural barriers, and personal barriers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings highlight the importance of cultural sensitivity when working with first-generation Chinese immigrants with diabetes. Implications for health professionals, local community centres and other potential service providers are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Chinese immigrants; collectivism; diabetes; health literacy; qualitative study

PMID:
25406155
PMCID:
PMC4244415
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005294
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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