Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Nov 14;11(11):11772-804. doi: 10.3390/ijerph111111772.

Non-accidental health impacts of wildfire smoke.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology of Respiratory and Allergic Disease (EPAR), UMR-S 1136, Institute Pierre Louis of Epidemiology and Public Health, National Institute for Health and Medical Research (INSERM), 27 Rue Chaligny, 75012 Paris, France. hassani.youssouf@upmc.fr.
2
Laboratory of Aerology, National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), University of Toulouse, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France. catherine.liousse@aero.obs-mip.fr.
3
Laboratory of Aerology, National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), University of Toulouse, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France. laurent.roblou@aero.obs-mip.fr.
4
Laboratory of Aerology, National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), University of Toulouse, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France. eric-michel.assamoi@aero.obs-mip.fr.
5
Environmental Epidemiology Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio, Finland. raimo.salonen@thl.fi.
6
Department of Epidemiology of Respiratory and Allergic Disease (EPAR), UMR-S 1136, Institute Pierre Louis of Epidemiology and Public Health, National Institute for Health and Medical Research (INSERM), 27 Rue Chaligny, 75012 Paris, France. carahenson@gmail.com.
7
Department of Epidemiology of Respiratory and Allergic Disease (EPAR), UMR-S 1136, Institute Pierre Louis of Epidemiology and Public Health, National Institute for Health and Medical Research (INSERM), 27 Rue Chaligny, 75012 Paris, France. soutrik.banerjee@upmc.fr.
8
Department of Epidemiology of Respiratory and Allergic Disease (EPAR), UMR-S 1136, Institute Pierre Louis of Epidemiology and Public Health, National Institute for Health and Medical Research (INSERM), 27 Rue Chaligny, 75012 Paris, France. isabella.annesi-maesano@inserm.fr.

Abstract

Wildfires take a heavy toll on human health worldwide. Climate change may increase the risk of wildfire frequency. Therefore, in view of adapted preventive actions, there is an urgent need to further understand the health effects and public awareness of wildfires. We conducted a systematic review of non-accidental health impacts of wildfire and incorporated lessons learned from recent experiences. Based on the literature, various studies have established the relationship between one of the major components of wildfire, particulate matter (particles with diameter less than 10 µm (PM10) and less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5)) and cardiorespiratory symptoms in terms of Emergency Rooms visits and hospital admissions. Associations between wildfire emissions and various subclinical effects have also been established. However, few relationships between wildfire emissions and mortality have been observed. Certain segments of the population may be particularly vulnerable to smoke-related health risks. Among them, people with pre-existing cardiopulmonary conditions, the elderly, smokers and, for professional reasons, firefighters. Potential action mechanisms have been highlighted. Overall, more research is needed to better understand health impact of wildfire exposure.

PMID:
25405597
PMCID:
PMC4245643
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph111111772
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center