Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Commun. 2014 Nov 18;5:5246. doi: 10.1038/ncomms6246.

Strain and structure heterogeneity in MoS2 atomic layers grown by chemical vapour deposition.

Author information

1
1] School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore [2] NOVITAS, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore [3] CINTRA CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Border X Block, Level 6, Singapore 637553, Singapore.
2
Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783, USA.
3
Department of Materials Science and Nanoengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005, USA.
4
1] Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle, Denton, Texas 76203, USA [2] Institute of New Energy, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102200, China.
5
Materials Science &Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA.
6
Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371, Singapore.
7
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle, Denton, Texas 76203, USA.

Abstract

Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted tremendous attention due to its promising applications in high-performance field-effect transistors, phototransistors, spintronic devices and nonlinear optics. The enhanced photoluminescence effect in monolayer MoS2 was discovered and, as a strong tool, was employed for strain and defect analysis in MoS2. Recently, large-size monolayer MoS2 has been produced by chemical vapour deposition, but has not yet been fully explored. Here we systematically characterize chemical vapour deposition-grown MoS2 by photoluminescence spectroscopy and mapping and demonstrate non-uniform strain in single-crystalline monolayer MoS2 and strain-induced bandgap engineering. We also evaluate the effective strain transferred from polymer substrates to MoS2 by three-dimensional finite element analysis. Furthermore, our work demonstrates that photoluminescence mapping can be used as a non-contact approach for quick identification of grain boundaries in MoS2.

PMID:
25404060
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms6246

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center