Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Jan;81(2):783-93. doi: 10.1128/AEM.02712-14. Epub 2014 Nov 14.

Dysbiosis and alterations in predicted functions of the subgingival microbiome in chronic periodontitis.

Author information

1
College of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
2
College of Dentistry, Department of Oral Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
3
College of Medicine and College of Public Health and Health Professions, Department of Biostatistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
4
College of Dentistry, Department of Periodontology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
5
College of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, Florida, USA gary.wang@medicine.ufl.edu.

Abstract

Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the periodontium affecting nearly 65 million adults in the United States. Changes in subgingival microbiota have long been associated with chronic periodontitis. Recent culture-independent molecular studies have revealed the immense richness and complexity of oral microbial communities. However, data sets across studies have not been directly compared, and whether the observed microbial variations are consistent across different studies is not known. Here, we used 16S rRNA sequencing to survey the subgingival microbiota in 25 subjects with chronic periodontal disease and 25 healthy controls and compared our data sets with those of three previously reported microbiome studies. Consistent with data from previous studies, our results demonstrate a significantly altered microbial community structure with decreased heterogeneity in periodontal disease. Comparison with data from three previously reported studies revealed that subgingival microbiota clustered by study. However, differences between periodontal health and disease were larger than the technical variations across studies. Using a prediction score and applying five different distance metrics, we observed two predominant clusters. One cluster was driven by Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas and was associated with clinically apparent periodontitis, and the second cluster was dominated by Rothia and Streptococcus in the majority of healthy sites. The predicted functional capabilities of the periodontitis microbiome were significantly altered. Genes involved in bacterial motility, energy metabolism, and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were overrepresented in periodontal disease, whereas genes associated with transporters, the phosphotransferase system, transcription factors, amino acid biosynthesis, and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis were enriched in healthy controls. These results demonstrate significant alterations in microbial composition and function in periodontitis and suggest genes and metabolic pathways associated with periodontal disease.

PMID:
25398868
PMCID:
PMC4277562
DOI:
10.1128/AEM.02712-14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center