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Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2014 Nov 13;56(1):132-8. doi: 10.1167/iovs.14-15194.

The driving visual field and a history of motor vehicle collision involvement in older drivers: a population-based examination.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States.
2
School of Optometry and Vision Science and Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We designed a visual field test focused on the field utilized while driving to examine associations between field impairment and motor vehicle collision involvement in 2000 drivers aged 70 years or older.

METHODS:

The "driving visual field test" involved measuring light sensitivity for 20 targets in each eye, extending 15° superiorly, 30° inferiorly, 60° temporally, and 30° nasally. The target locations were selected on the basis that they fell within the field region utilized when viewing through the windshield of a vehicle or viewing the dashboard while driving. Monocular fields were combined into a binocular field based on the more sensitive point from each eye. Severe impairment in the overall field or a region was defined as average sensitivity in the lowest quartile of sensitivity. At-fault collision involvement for 5 years prior to enrollment was obtained from state records. Poisson regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted rate ratios (RRs) examining the association between field impairment and at-fault collision involvement.

RESULTS:

Drivers with severe binocular field impairment in the overall driving visual field had a 40% increased rate of at-fault collision involvement (RR, 1.40; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07-1.83). Impairment in the lower and left fields was associated with elevated collision rates (RR, 1.40; 95% CI: 1.07-1.82 and RR, 1.49; 95% CI: 1.15-1.92, respectively), whereas impairment in the upper and right field regions was not.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results suggest that older drivers with severe impairment in the lower or left region of the driving visual field are more likely to have a history of at-fault collision involvement.

KEYWORDS:

aging; driving; visual field

PMID:
25395488
PMCID:
PMC4288142
DOI:
10.1167/iovs.14-15194
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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