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J Neurosci. 2014 Nov 12;34(46):15178-83. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3252-14.2014.

New roles for the external globus pallidus in basal ganglia circuits and behavior.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences and Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, agittis@cmu.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Neuroscience Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
3
Department of Physiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 48109.
4
Institut des maladies neurodégénératives, CNRS UMR 5293, Université de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux, France.
5
Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition and Systems Neuroscience Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, and.
6
BrainLinks-BrainTools, Bernstein Center Freiburg, University of Freiburg, Freiburg 79085, Germany.

Abstract

The development of methodology to identify specific cell populations and circuits within the basal ganglia is rapidly transforming our ability to understand the function of this complex circuit. This mini-symposium highlights recent advances in delineating the organization and function of neural circuits in the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe). Although long considered a homogeneous structure in the motor-suppressing "indirect-pathway," the GPe consists of a number of distinct cell types and anatomical subdomains that contribute differentially to both motor and nonmotor features of behavior. Here, we integrate recent studies using techniques, such as viral tracing, transgenic mice, electrophysiology, and behavioral approaches, to create a revised framework for understanding how the GPe relates to behavior in both health and disease.

PMID:
25392486
PMCID:
PMC4228126
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3252-14.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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