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Med J Aust. 2014 Nov 17;201(10):596-600.

The safety of seasonal influenza vaccines in Australian children in 2013.

Author information

1
National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, NSW, Australia. nicholas.wood@health.nsw.gov.au.
2
Department of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA, Australia.
3
Vaccine Trials Group, Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Perth, WA, Australia.
4
Discipline of Paediatrics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
5
SAEFVIC (Surveillance of Adverse Events Following Vaccination In the Community), Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
6
Department of General Medicine, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
7
WentWest (Western Sydney Medicare Local), Sydney, NSW, Australia.
8
National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine influenza vaccine safety in Australian children aged under 10 years in 2013.

DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING:

Active prospective surveillance study conducted with parents or carers of children who received influenza vaccine in outpatient clinics at six tertiary paediatric hospitals or from selected primary health care providers between 18 March and 19 July 2013.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Parental-reported frequency of systemic reactions (fever, headache, nausea, abdominal symptoms, convulsions, rash, rigors and fatigue), injection site reactions (erythema, swelling and/or pain at the injection site), use of antipyretics or analgesics, and medical attendance or advice within 72 hours after vaccination.

RESULTS:

Of 981 children enrolled in the surveillance, 893 children aged 6 months to < 10 years were eligible for inclusion. These children received 1052 influenza vaccine doses. Fever was reported in 5.5% (95% CI, 4.1%-7.3%) and 6.5% (95% CI, 3.5%-10.9%) of children after Doses 1 and 2, respectively. One febrile convulsion occurred in a child with a known seizure disorder. Injection site reactions occurred in 21.2% (95% CI, 18.5%-24.1%) and 6.0% (95% CI, 3.1%-10.2%) after Doses 1 and 2, respectively; most were mild. Very few parents sought medical follow-up for their child's reaction: 22 (2.6%; 95% CI, 1.6%-3.9%) after Dose 1, and 11 (5.5%; 95% CI, 2.8%-9.6%) after Dose 2.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results are consistent with clinical trials and other observational studies of influenza vaccines currently registered for use in young children in Australia and can reassure parents and health care providers that influenza vaccination is safe and well tolerated.

PMID:
25390267
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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