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Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2015 Jan;152(1):180-4. doi: 10.1177/0194599814557467. Epub 2014 Nov 11.

Role of polysomnography in the development of an algorithm for planning tracheostomy decannulation.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
2
Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA Deepak.mehta@chp.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the role of polysomnography (PSG) in helping determine readiness of tracheostomized patients for decannulation.

STUDY DESIGN:

Case series with chart review of pediatric patients who underwent PSG with tracheostomy tube in place with the goal of decannulation.

SETTING:

Tertiary care pediatric center.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Twenty-eight tracheostomized patients who underwent PSG from January 2006 to March 2012 were included. Outcome measures were successful decannulation, PSG results, surgical procedures, and medical comorbidities.

RESULTS:

Of the 28 patients, 20 (71.4%) were decannulated and 8 (28.6%) were not. One (3.6%) patient failed long-term decannulation. The average apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) with a capped tracheostomy for those successfully decannulated was 2.75 (range, 0.6-7.6), while the AHI for those not decannulated was 15.99 (range, 3.2-62). Factors associated with success or failure to decannulate were assessed, and an algorithm was developed to plan for successful decannulation. Laryngotracheal reconstruction was a significant factor in those successfully decannulated. Those who were not decannulated had multiple medical comorbidities, multilevel airway obstruction, need for additional surgery, or chronic need for pulmonary toilet.

CONCLUSIONS:

Polysomnography may be a useful adjunctive study in the process of determining a patient's readiness for decannulation. Our current algorithm for decannulation includes upper airway endoscopy with identification of levels of obstruction, followed by surgical correction of those obstructions; capped PSG to determine patency of the airway and help assess lung function; and overnight intensive care unit admission for capping trial, with decannulation the following day if well tolerated.

KEYWORDS:

decannulation; pediatric airway; polysomnogram; tracheostomy

PMID:
25389316
DOI:
10.1177/0194599814557467
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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