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Nat Genet. 2014 Dec;46(12):1321-6. doi: 10.1038/ng.3145. Epub 2014 Nov 10.

Identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) clades with long-term global distribution.

Author information

1
1] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. [2] Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK.
2
1] Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK. [2] Organisms and Environment Division, Cardiff University School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
3
Centre of Infection Medicine, Institute of Microbiology and Epizootics, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
4
Interdisciplinary Research Organization, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan.
5
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK.
6
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
7
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
8
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
9
1] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. [2] Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a major cause of infectious diarrhea, produce heat-stable and/or heat-labile enterotoxins and at least 25 different colonization factors that target the intestinal mucosa. The genes encoding the enterotoxins and most of the colonization factors are located on plasmids found across diverse E. coli serogroups. Whole-genome sequencing of a representative collection of ETEC isolated between 1980 and 2011 identified globally distributed lineages characterized by distinct colonization factor and enterotoxin profiles. Contrary to current notions, these relatively recently emerged lineages might harbor chromosome and plasmid combinations that optimize fitness and transmissibility. These data have implications for understanding, tracking and possibly preventing ETEC disease.

PMID:
25383970
DOI:
10.1038/ng.3145
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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