Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nature. 2014 Nov 27;515(7528):518-22. doi: 10.1038/nature13959. Epub 2014 Nov 12.

Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health.

Author information

1
1] Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA [2] Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA.
2
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA.

Abstract

Diets link environmental and human health. Rising incomes and urbanization are driving a global dietary transition in which traditional diets are replaced by diets higher in refined sugars, refined fats, oils and meats. By 2050 these dietary trends, if unchecked, would be a major contributor to an estimated 80 per cent increase in global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions from food production and to global land clearing. Moreover, these dietary shifts are greatly increasing the incidence of type II diabetes, coronary heart disease and other chronic non-communicable diseases that lower global life expectancies. Alternative diets that offer substantial health benefits could, if widely adopted, reduce global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, reduce land clearing and resultant species extinctions, and help prevent such diet-related chronic non-communicable diseases. The implementation of dietary solutions to the tightly linked diet-environment-health trilemma is a global challenge, and opportunity, of great environmental and public health importance.

PMID:
25383533
DOI:
10.1038/nature13959
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center