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J Am Board Fam Med. 2014 Nov-Dec;27(6):738-9. doi: 10.3122/jabfm.2014.06.140053.

Practice-based innovations: More relevant and transportable than NIH-funded studies.

Author information

1
From the Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (RSE, MG); the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Rutgers University Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (KAH, BFC); and the Departments of Family and Community Health, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Sociology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (KCS). Rsetz@vcu.edu.
2
From the Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (RSE, MG); the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Rutgers University Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (KAH, BFC); and the Departments of Family and Community Health, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Sociology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (KCS).

Abstract

In 2003, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) created a translational science funding stream to foster widespread, practice-based dissemination of scientific evidence. A decade later, our study of a national cohort of innovative practices suggests that effective dissemination continues to be prevented by the limited biomedical focus of funded research, conventional research strategies, and failure to report contextual factors.

KEYWORDS:

Health Policy; Practice-based Research; Primary Health Care; Program Sustainability; Translational Medical Science

PMID:
25381069
DOI:
10.3122/jabfm.2014.06.140053
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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