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PLoS One. 2014 Nov 7;9(11):e112711. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0112711. eCollection 2014.

Clinical and molecular epidemiology of haemophilus influenzae causing invasive disease in adult patients.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Universitat de Barcelona-IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain; CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERes), ISCIII, Madrid, Spain.
2
Department of Infectious Diseases, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Universitat de Barcelona-IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain; CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERes), ISCIII, Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) has changed since the introduction of the Hi type b (Hib) vaccine. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and molecular epidemiology of Hi invasive disease in adults.

METHODS:

Clinical data of the 82 patients with Hi invasive infections were analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility, serotyping, and genotyping were studied (2008-2013).

RESULTS:

Men accounted for 63.4% of patients (whose mean age was 64.3 years). The most frequent comorbidities were immunosuppressive therapy (34.1%), malignancy (31.7%), diabetes, and COPD (both 22%). The 30-day mortality rate was 20.7%. The majority of the strains (84.3%) were nontypeable (NTHi) and serotype f was the most prevalent serotype in the capsulated strains. The highest antimicrobial resistance was for cotrimoxazole (27.1%) and ampicillin (14.3%). Twenty-three isolates (32.9%) had amino acid changes in the PBP3 involved in resistance. Capsulated strains were clonal and belonged to clonal complexes 6 (serotype b), 124 (serotype f), and 18 (serotype e), whereas NTHi were genetically diverse.

CONCLUSIONS:

Invasive Hi disease occurred mainly in elderly and those with underlying conditions, and it was associated with a high mortality rate. NTHi were the most common cause of invasive disease and showed high genetic diversity.

PMID:
25379704
PMCID:
PMC4224504
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0112711
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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