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Int J Obes (Lond). 2014 Sep;38 Suppl 2:S26-31. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2014.132.

C-reactive protein reference percentiles among pre-adolescent children in Europe based on the IDEFICS study population.

Author information

1
Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
2
Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
3
Unit of Epidemiology and Population Genetics, Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
4
Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum Dr Eberhard und Partner Dortmund, Laboratoriumsmedizin, Dortmund, Germany.
5
National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
6
National Institute of Health Promotion, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
7
Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
8
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
9
Department of Paediatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
10
Laboratory of Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo, NEUROMED, Italy.
11
1] Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany [2] Institute of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Bremen University, Bremen, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

C-reactive protein (CRP) is involved in a wide range of diseases. It is a powerful marker for inflammatory processes used for diagnostic and monitoring purposes. We aimed to establish reference values as data on the distribution of serum CRP levels in young European children are scarce.

SUBJECTS:

Reference values of high-sensitivity CRP concentrations were calculated for 9855 children aged 2.0-10.9 years, stratified by age and sex. The children were recruited during the population-based European IDEFICS study (Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health Effects in Children and infantS) with 18 745 participants recruited from 2007 to 2010.

RESULTS:

In 44.1% of the children, CRP values were below or equal the detection limit of 0.2 mg/l. Median CRP concentrations showed a slight negative age trend in boys and girls, whereas serum CRP values were slightly higher in girls than in boys across all age groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our population-based reference values of CRP may guide paediatric practice as elevated values may require further investigation or treatment. Therefore, the presented reference values represent a basis for clinical evaluation and for future research on risk assessment of diseases associated with increased CRP levels among children.

PMID:
25376218
DOI:
10.1038/ijo.2014.132
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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