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PLoS One. 2014 Nov 6;9(11):e111213. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0111213. eCollection 2014.

Virulence diversity among bacteremic Aeromonas isolates: ex vivo, animal, and clinical evidences.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Cheng Kung University College of Medicine, Tainan, Taiwan.
2
Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Cheng Kung University College of Medicine, Tainan, Taiwan; National Institute of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, National Health Research Institutes, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University College of Medicine, Tainan, Taiwan; Research Center of Infectious Disease and Signaling, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
4
Department of Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Health and Nutrition, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan.
5
Department of Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Medical Research, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Clinical Pathology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.
7
Department of Medical Research, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan.
8
Department of Pathology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.
9
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, National Cheng Kung University College of Medicine, Tainan, Taiwan.
10
Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan; Department of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University College of Medicine, Tainan, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The objective of this study was to compare virulence among different Aeromonas species causing bloodstream infections.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Nine of four species of Aeromonas blood isolates, including A. dhakensis, A. hydrophila, A. veronii and A. caviae were randomly selected for analysis. The species was identified by the DNA sequence matching of rpoD. Clinically, the patients with A. dhakensis bacteremia had a higher sepsis-related mortality rate than those with other species (37.5% vs. 0%, P = 0.028). Virulence of different Aeromonas species were tested in C. elegans, mouse fibroblast C2C12 cell line and BALB/c mice models. C. elegans fed with A. dhakensis and A. caviae had the lowest and highest survival rates compared with other species, respectively (all P values <0.0001). A. dhakensis isolates also exhibited more cytotoxicity in C2C12 cell line (all P values <0.0001). Fourteen-day survival rate of mice intramuscularly inoculated with A. dhakensis was lower than that of other species (all P values <0.0001). Hemolytic activity and several virulence factor genes were rarely detected in the A. caviae isolates.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

Clinical data, ex vivo experiments, and animal studies suggest there is virulence variation among clinically important Aeromonas species.

PMID:
25375798
PMCID:
PMC4222899
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0111213
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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