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Nature. 2014 Nov 6;515(7525):67-73. doi: 10.1038/nature13947.

The performance and potential of protected areas.

Author information

1
1] School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia. [2] Wildlife Conservation Society, Global Conservation Program, Bronx, New York 10460, USA. [3] School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia.
2
1] School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia. [2] Equilibrium Research, 47 The Quays, Cumberland Road, Spike Island, Bristol BS1 6UQ, UK.
3
1] Wildlife Conservation Society, Global Conservation Program, Bronx, New York 10460, USA. [2] School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia.
4
1] School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia. [2] UNEP-World Conservation Monitoring Centre, Cambridge CD3 0DL, UK.

Abstract

Originally conceived to conserve iconic landscapes and wildlife, protected areas are now expected to achieve an increasingly diverse set of conservation, social and economic objectives. The amount of land and sea designated as formally protected has markedly increased over the past century, but there is still a major shortfall in political commitments to enhance the coverage and effectiveness of protected areas. Financial support for protected areas is dwarfed by the benefits that they provide, but these returns depend on effective management. A step change involving increased recognition, funding, planning and enforcement is urgently needed if protected areas are going to fulfil their potential.

PMID:
25373676
DOI:
10.1038/nature13947
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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