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Nature. 2014 Nov 6;515(7525):58-66. doi: 10.1038/nature13946.

Learning to coexist with wildfire.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, Division of Ecosystem Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, 130 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.
2
1] Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, Division of Ecosystem Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, 130 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. [2] Forest Sciences Center of Catalonia &Center for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications, Pujada del Seminari, 28250 Solsona, Spain.
3
University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522, Australia.
4
Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200, Australia.
5
RMIT University, 124 Little La Trobe Street, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia.
6
US Forest Service, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington DC 20250-1111, USA.
7
CSIRO, Clayton South, Victoria 3169, Australia.
8
University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA.
9
University of Colorado, Boulder, Boulder 80309-0450, Colorado, USA.
10
Conservation Biology Institute, 136 SW Washington Avenue, Suite 202, Corvallis, Oregon 97333, USA.

Abstract

The impacts of escalating wildfire in many regions - the lives and homes lost, the expense of suppression and the damage to ecosystem services - necessitate a more sustainable coexistence with wildfire. Climate change and continued development on fire-prone landscapes will only compound current problems. Emerging strategies for managing ecosystems and mitigating risks to human communities provide some hope, although greater recognition of their inherent variation and links is crucial. Without a more integrated framework, fire will never operate as a natural ecosystem process, and the impact on society will continue to grow. A more coordinated approach to risk management and land-use planning in these coupled systems is needed.

PMID:
25373675
DOI:
10.1038/nature13946
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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