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Environ Microbiol. 2015 Jul;17(7):2288-305. doi: 10.1111/1462-2920.12689. Epub 2015 Jan 27.

The FlxABCD-HdrABC proteins correspond to a novel NADH dehydrogenase/heterodisulfide reductase widespread in anaerobic bacteria and involved in ethanol metabolism in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

Author information

1
Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras, 2780-157, Portugal.
2
Biochemistry Department, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA.
3
ENIGMA (Ecosystems and Networks Integrated with Genes and Molecular Assemblies), Berkeley, CA, USA.

Abstract

Flavin-based electron bifurcation (FBEB) is an important mechanism for the energy metabolism of anaerobes. A new family of NADH dehydrogenases, the flavin oxidoreductase (FlxABCD, previously called FloxABCD), was proposed to perform FBEB in sulphate-reducing organisms coupled with heterodisulfide reductase (HdrABC). We found that the hdrABC-flxABCD gene cluster is widespread among anaerobic bacteria, pointing to a general and important role in their bioenergetics. In this work, we studied FlxABCD of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. The hdr-flx genes are part of the same transcriptional unit and are increased in transcription during growth in ethanol-sulfate, and to a less extent during pyruvate fermentation. Two mutant strains were generated: one where expression of the hdr-flx genes was interrupted and another lacking the flxA gene. Both strains were unable to grow with ethanol-sulfate, whereas growth was restored in a flxA-complemented strain. The mutant strains also produced very reduced amounts of ethanol compared with the wild type during pyruvate fermentation. Our results show that in D. vulgaris, the FlxABCD-HdrABC proteins are essential for NADH oxidation during growth on ethanol, probably involving a FBEB mechanism that leads to reduction of ferredoxin and the small protein DsrC, while in fermentation they operate in reverse, reducing NAD(+) for ethanol production.

PMID:
25367508
DOI:
10.1111/1462-2920.12689
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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