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Molecules. 2014 Oct 31;19(11):17697-714. doi: 10.3390/molecules191117697.

Evaluating the anti-neuroinflammatory capacity of raw and steamed garlic as well as five organosulfur compounds.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science, Yuanpei University, No. 306, Yuanpei Street, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan. sche@mail.ypu.edu.tw.
2
Department of Food Science, Yuanpei University, No. 306, Yuanpei Street, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan. mssu@mail.ypu.edu.tw.

Abstract

The anti-neuroinflammatory capacities of raw and steamed garlic extracts as well as five organosulfur compounds (OSCs) were examined in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. According to those results, steaming pretreatment blocked the formation of alliinase-catalyzed OSCs such as allicin and diallyl trisulfide (DATS) in crushed garlic. Raw garlic, but not steamed garlic, dose-dependently attenuated the production of LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). DATS and diallyl disulfide at 200 and 400 μM, respectively, displayed significant anti-neuroinflammatory activity. Meanwhile, even at 1 mM, diallyl sulfide, S-allyl cysteine and alliin did not display such activity. Inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation was the mechanism underlying this protective effect of raw garlic and DATS. Analysis results indicated that the anti-neuroinflammatory capacity of raw garlic is due to the alliin-derived OSCs. Importantly, DATS is a highly promising therapeutic candidate for treating inflammation-related neurodegenerative diseases.

PMID:
25365295
DOI:
10.3390/molecules191117697
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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