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Nature. 2015 Jan 15;517(7534):396-400. doi: 10.1038/nature13872. Epub 2014 Nov 2.

Subnanometre-resolution electron cryomicroscopy structure of a heterodimeric ABC exporter.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, 600 16th Street, San Francisco, California 94158, USA.
2
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California San Francisco, 600 16th Street, San Francisco, California 94158, USA.
3
Institute of Biochemistry, Biocenter, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 9, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
4
1] Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, 600 16th Street, San Francisco, California 94158, USA [2] Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California San Francisco, 600 16th Street, San Francisco, California 94158, USA.
5
1] Institute of Biochemistry, Biocenter, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 9, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany [2] Cluster of Excellence - Macromolecular Complexes, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 9, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Abstract

ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters translocate substrates across cell membranes, using energy harnessed from ATP binding and hydrolysis at their nucleotide-binding domains. ABC exporters are present both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, with examples implicated in multidrug resistance of pathogens and cancer cells, as well as in many human diseases. TmrAB is a heterodimeric ABC exporter from the thermophilic Gram-negative eubacterium Thermus thermophilus; it is homologous to various multidrug transporters and contains one degenerate site with a non-catalytic residue next to the Walker B motif. Here we report a subnanometre-resolution structure of detergent-solubilized TmrAB in a nucleotide-free, inward-facing conformation by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy. The reconstructions clearly resolve characteristic features of ABC transporters, including helices in the transmembrane domain and nucleotide-binding domains. A cavity in the transmembrane domain is accessible laterally from the cytoplasmic side of the membrane as well as from the cytoplasm, indicating that the transporter lies in an inward-facing open conformation. The two nucleotide-binding domains remain in contact via their carboxy-terminal helices. Furthermore, comparison between our structure and the crystal structures of other ABC transporters suggests a possible trajectory of conformational changes that involves a sliding and rotating motion between the two nucleotide-binding domains during the transition from the inward-facing to outward-facing conformations.

PMID:
25363761
PMCID:
PMC4372080
DOI:
10.1038/nature13872
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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