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Nat Genet. 2014 Dec;46(12):1303-10. doi: 10.1038/ng.3137. Epub 2014 Nov 2.

Whole-genome sequencing of the snub-nosed monkey provides insights into folivory and evolutionary history.

Author information

1
1] Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. [2] University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
2
Novogene Bioinformatics Institute, Beijing, China.
3
Institute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine, Department of Biology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
4
Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
5
College of Nature Conservation at the Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, China.
6
College of Animal Science and Technology, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya'an, China.
7
Beijing Wildlife Park, Beijing, China.
8
Beijing Zoo, Beijing, China.
9
College of Life Science and Technology, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, China.
10
College of Life Sciences, Northwest University, Xi'an, China.
11
Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biodiversity and Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China.
12
Primate Genetics Laboratory, German Primate Center, Göttingen, Germany.
13
1] Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA. [2] Program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA.
14
Biodiversity and Ecological Processes Group, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.

Abstract

Colobines are a unique group of Old World monkeys that principally eat leaves and seeds rather than fruits and insects. We report the sequencing at 146× coverage, de novo assembly and analyses of the genome of a male golden snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) and resequencing at 30× coverage of three related species (Rhinopithecus bieti, Rhinopithecus brelichi and Rhinopithecus strykeri). Comparative analyses showed that Asian colobines have an enhanced ability to derive energy from fatty acids and to degrade xenobiotics. We found evidence for functional evolution in the colobine RNASE1 gene, encoding a key secretory RNase that digests the high concentrations of bacterial RNA derived from symbiotic microflora. Demographic reconstructions indicated that the profile of ancient effective population sizes for R. roxellana more closely resembles that of giant panda rather than its congeners. These findings offer new insights into the dietary adaptations and evolutionary history of colobine primates.

PMID:
25362486
DOI:
10.1038/ng.3137
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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