Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Infect Dis. 2015 Apr 15;211(8):1219-28. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiu594. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

Elevated levels of monocyte activation markers are associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in men with and those without HIV infection.

Author information

1
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
2
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
3
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.
4
Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.
5
University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
6
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California.
7
University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington.
8
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Heightened immune activation among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons may contribute to atherosclerosis. We assessed associations of serologic markers of monocyte activation, soluble CD163 (sCD163) and soluble CD14 (sCD14), and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (CCL2) with subclinical atherosclerosis among men with and those without HIV infection in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study.

METHODS:

We performed noncontrast computed tomography on 906 men (566 HIV-infected men and 340 HIV-uninfected men), 709 of whom also underwent coronary computed tomographic angiography. Associations between each biomarker and the prevalence of coronary plaque, the prevalence of stenosis of ≥50%, and the extent of plaque were assessed by logistic and linear regression, adjusting for age, race, HIV serostatus, and cardiovascular risk factors.

RESULTS:

Levels of all biomarkers were higher among HIV-infected men, of whom 81% had undetectable HIV RNA, and were associated with lower CD4(+) T-cell counts. In the entire population and among HIV-infected men, higher biomarker levels were associated with a greater prevalence of coronary artery stenosis of ≥50%. Higher sCD163 levels were also associated with greater prevalences of coronary artery calcium, mixed plaque, and calcified plaque; higher CCL2 levels were associated with a greater extent of noncalcified plaque.

CONCLUSIONS:

sCD163, sCD14, and CCL2 levels were elevated in treated HIV-infected men and associated with atherosclerosis. Monocyte activation may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease in individuals with HIV infection.

KEYWORDS:

atherosclerosis; human immunodeficiency virus; inflammation; monocyte activation; plaque

PMID:
25362192
PMCID:
PMC4402336
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiu594
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Publication types, MeSH terms, Substances, Grant support

Publication types

MeSH terms

Substances

Grant support

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center