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Neurology. 2014 Dec 9;83(24):2278-84. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000001084. Epub 2014 Oct 31.

Motoric cognitive risk syndrome: Multicenter incidence study.

Author information

1
From the Departments of Neurology (J.V., E.A., R.H., M.J.K., R.B.L.), Medicine (J.V., N.B.), and Epidemiology and Population Health (R.B.L., C.W.), Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY; Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center (D.A.B., A.S.B.), Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL; and Ferkauf School of Psychology (R.H.), Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY. joe.verghese@einstein.yu.edu.
2
From the Departments of Neurology (J.V., E.A., R.H., M.J.K., R.B.L.), Medicine (J.V., N.B.), and Epidemiology and Population Health (R.B.L., C.W.), Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY; Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center (D.A.B., A.S.B.), Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL; and Ferkauf School of Psychology (R.H.), Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To report incidence and risk factors for motoric cognitive risk syndrome (MCR), a newly described predementia syndrome characterized by slow gait and cognitive complaints.

METHODS:

We examined incidence rates of MCR in 3,128 adults aged 60 years and older, MCR- and dementia-free at baseline, participating in 4 US-based cohort studies. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of modifiable risk factors with risk of MCR were computed using Cox models.

RESULTS:

Over a median follow-up time of 3.2 years, 823 of the 3,128 participants met MCR criteria. The overall age- and sex-adjusted incidence of MCR was 65.2/1,000 person-years (95% CI: 53.3-77.1), and ranged from 50.8/1,000 person-years to 79.6/1,000 person-years in the individual cohorts. MCR incidence was higher with older age but there were no sex differences. In the pooled sample adjusted for age, sex, education, and cohort source, strokes (HR 1.42, 95% CI: 1.14-1.77), Parkinson disease (HR 2.52, 95% CI: 1.68-3.76), depressive symptoms (HR 1.65, 95% CI: 1.28-2.13), sedentariness (HR 1.76, 95% CI: 1.44-2.17), and obesity (HR 1.39, 95% CI: 1.17-1.65) predicted risk of incident MCR.

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence of MCR is high in older adults. Identification of modifiable risk factors for MCR will improve identification of high-risk individuals and help develop interventions to prevent cognitive decline in aging.

PMID:
25361778
PMCID:
PMC4277675
DOI:
10.1212/WNL.0000000000001084
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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