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PLoS One. 2014 Oct 31;9(10):e111787. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0111787. eCollection 2014.

Low-dose curcumin stimulates proliferation, migration and phagocytic activity of olfactory ensheathing cells.

Author information

1
Eskitis Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia.
2
Eskitis Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia; School of Biomedical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
3
Nature Communications, New York, New York, United States of America.
4
Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa, Madrid, Spain.
5
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

One of the promising strategies for neural repair therapies is the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) which are the glial cells of the olfactory system. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the behaviour of mouse OECs to determine if it could be of use to further enhance the therapeutic potential of OECs. Curcumin, a natural polyphenol compound found in the spice turmeric, is known for its anti-cancer properties at doses over 10 µM, and often at 50 µM, and it exerts its effects on cancer cells in part by activation of MAP kinases. In contrast, we found that low-dose curcumin (0.5 µM) applied to OECs strikingly modulated the dynamic morphology, increased the rate of migration by up to 4-fold, and promoted significant proliferation of the OECs. Most dramatically, low-dose curcumin stimulated a 10-fold increase in the phagocytic activity of OECs. All of these potently stimulated behavioural characteristics of OECs are favourable for neural repair therapies. Importantly, low-dose curcumin gave a transient activation of p38 kinases, which is in contrast to the high dose curcumin effects on cancer cells in which these MAP kinases tend to undergo prolonged activation. Low-dose curcumin mediated effects on OECs demonstrate cell-type specific stimulation of p38 and ERK kinases. These results constitute the first evidence that low-dose curcumin can modulate the behaviour of olfactory glia into a phenotype potentially more favourable for neural repair and thereby improve the therapeutic use of OECs for neural repair therapies.

PMID:
25360677
PMCID:
PMC4216124
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0111787
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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