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Science. 2014 Nov 21;346(6212):987-91. doi: 10.1126/science.1259595. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

Host genetic diversity enables Ebola hemorrhagic fever pathogenesis and resistance.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
2
Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. Laboratory of Virology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT, USA.
3
Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
4
Rocky Mountain Veterinary Branch, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT, USA.
5
Laboratory of Virology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT, USA.
6
Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
7
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
8
Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. Washington National Primate Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA. honey@uw.edu.

Abstract

Existing mouse models of lethal Ebola virus infection do not reproduce hallmark symptoms of Ebola hemorrhagic fever, neither delayed blood coagulation and disseminated intravascular coagulation nor death from shock, thus restricting pathogenesis studies to nonhuman primates. Here we show that mice from the Collaborative Cross panel of recombinant inbred mice exhibit distinct disease phenotypes after mouse-adapted Ebola virus infection. Phenotypes range from complete resistance to lethal disease to severe hemorrhagic fever characterized by prolonged coagulation times and 100% mortality. Inflammatory signaling was associated with vascular permeability and endothelial activation, and resistance to lethal infection arose by induction of lymphocyte differentiation and cellular adhesion, probably mediated by the susceptibility allele Tek. These data indicate that genetic background determines susceptibility to Ebola hemorrhagic fever.

PMID:
25359852
PMCID:
PMC4241145
DOI:
10.1126/science.1259595
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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