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Eur Respir J. 2015 Apr;45(4):1027-36. doi: 10.1183/09031936.00102214. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

Maternal vitamin D and E intakes during pregnancy are associated with asthma in children.

Author information

1
Dept of Child Health, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.
2
Public Health Nutrition Group, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.
3
Institute of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
4
Dept of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.
5
Dept of Child Health, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK g.devereux@abdn.ac.uk.

Abstract

Are maternal vitamin D and E intakes during pregnancy associated with asthma in 10-year-old children? In a longitudinal study of 1924 children born to women recruited during pregnancy, maternal vitamin D intake during pregnancy was assessed by the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and vitamin E by FFQ and plasma α-tocopherol; respiratory questionnaires were completed for the 10-year-old children. Their treatment for asthma was also ascertained using administrative data. Longitudinal analyses included data collected at 1, 2, 5 and 10 years. Symptom data were available for 934 (49%) children and use of asthma medication for 1748 (91%). In the children maternal vitamin D intake during pregnancy was negatively associated with doctor-diagnosed asthma at 10 years of age (OR per intake quintile 0.86, 95% CI 0.74-0.99) and over the first 10 years (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% CI 0.81-1.00). Maternal plasma α-tocopherol at 11 weeks gestation was negatively associated with children receiving asthma treatment (OR per standard deviation increase 0.52, 95% CI 0.31-0.87). Maternal vitamin E intake was negatively associated with doctor-diagnosed asthma (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.81-0.99) in the first 10 years. Low maternal vitamin D and E intakes during pregnancy are associated with increased risk of children developing asthma in the first 10 years of life. These associations may have significant public health implications.

PMID:
25359350
DOI:
10.1183/09031936.00102214
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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