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Nat Commun. 2014 Oct 31;5:5302. doi: 10.1038/ncomms6302.

Coordinated regulation of photosynthesis in rice increases yield and tolerance to environmental stress.

Author information

1
Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA.
2
Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, USA.
3
School of Plant, Environmental, and Soil Sciences, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA.
4
1] Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA [2] Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, USA.

Abstract

Plants capture solar energy and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) through photosynthesis, which is the primary component of crop yield, and needs to be increased considerably to meet the growing global demand for food. Environmental stresses, which are increasing with climate change, adversely affect photosynthetic carbon metabolism (PCM) and limit yield of cereals such as rice (Oryza sativa) that feeds half the world. To study the regulation of photosynthesis, we developed a rice gene regulatory network and identified a transcription factor HYR (HIGHER YIELD RICE) associated with PCM, which on expression in rice enhances photosynthesis under multiple environmental conditions, determining a morpho-physiological programme leading to higher grain yield under normal, drought and high-temperature stress conditions. We show HYR is a master regulator, directly activating photosynthesis genes, cascades of transcription factors and other downstream genes involved in PCM and yield stability under drought and high-temperature environmental stress conditions.

PMID:
25358745
PMCID:
PMC4220491
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms6302
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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