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J Pediatr Psychol. 2015 Oct;40(9):934-42. doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsu094. Epub 2014 Oct 28.

Risk and Resilience in Pediatric Chronic Pain: Exploring the Protective Role of Optimism.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University.
2
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, llcohen@gsu.edu.
3
Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Center for Pain Relief, and Emory University School of Medicine.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Fear of pain and pain catastrophizing are prominent risk factors for pediatric chronic pain-related maladjustment. Although resilience has largely been ignored in the pediatric pain literature, prior research suggests that optimism might benefit youth and can be learned. We applied an adult chronic pain risk-resilience model to examine the interplay of risk factors and optimism on functioning outcomes in youth with chronic pain.

METHOD:

Participants included 58 children and adolescents (8-17 years) attending a chronic pain clinic and their parents. Participants completed measures of fear of pain, pain catastrophizing, optimism, disability, and quality of life.

RESULTS:

Consistent with the literature, pain intensity, fear of pain, and catastrophizing predicted functioning. Optimism was a unique predictor of quality of life, and optimism contributed to better functioning by minimizing pain-related fear and catastrophizing.

CONCLUSIONS:

Optimism might be protective and offset the negative influence of fear of pain and catastrophizing on pain-related functioning.

KEYWORDS:

adjustment; chronic and recurrent pain; quality of life; resilience

PMID:
25355543
DOI:
10.1093/jpepsy/jsu094
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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