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Sports Med. 2014 Nov;44 Suppl 2:S117-25. doi: 10.1007/s40279-014-0252-0.

Using molecular biology to maximize concurrent training.

Author information

1
Functional Molecular Biology Lab, Department of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, University of California Davis, One Shields Ave, 174 Briggs Hall, Davis, CA, 95616, USA, kbaar@ucdavis.edu.

Abstract

Very few sports use only endurance or strength. Outside of running long distances on a flat surface and power-lifting, practically all sports require some combination of endurance and strength. Endurance and strength can be developed simultaneously to some degree. However, the development of a high level of endurance seems to prohibit the development or maintenance of muscle mass and strength. This interaction between endurance and strength is called the concurrent training effect. This review specifically defines the concurrent training effect, discusses the potential molecular mechanisms underlying this effect, and proposes strategies to maximize strength and endurance in the high-level athlete.

PMID:
25355186
PMCID:
PMC4213370
DOI:
10.1007/s40279-014-0252-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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