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ISME J. 2015 Jun;9(6):1477-80. doi: 10.1038/ismej.2014.205. Epub 2014 Oct 28.

Linking soil bacterial biodiversity and soil carbon stability.

Author information

1
1] Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA [2] Center for Ecosystem Science and Society (Ecoss), Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA.
2
1] Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen North), Flagstaff, AZ, USA [2] Microbial Genetic and Genomics Center (MGGen), Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA.
3
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen North), Flagstaff, AZ, USA.
4
1] Center for Ecosystem Science and Society (Ecoss), Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA [2] Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen North), Flagstaff, AZ, USA [3] Microbial Genetic and Genomics Center (MGGen), Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA.

Abstract

Native soil carbon (C) can be lost in response to fresh C inputs, a phenomenon observed for decades yet still not understood. Using dual-stable isotope probing, we show that changes in the diversity and composition of two functional bacterial groups occur with this 'priming' effect. A single-substrate pulse suppressed native soil C loss and reduced bacterial diversity, whereas repeated substrate pulses stimulated native soil C loss and increased diversity. Increased diversity after repeated C amendments contrasts with resource competition theory, and may be explained by increased predation as evidenced by a decrease in bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results suggest that biodiversity and composition of the soil microbial community change in concert with its functioning, with consequences for native soil C stability.

PMID:
25350158
PMCID:
PMC4438316
DOI:
10.1038/ismej.2014.205
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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