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Int J Mol Sci. 2014 Oct 27;15(11):19458-71. doi: 10.3390/ijms151119458.

Mixed pro- and anti-oxidative effects of pomegranate polyphenols in cultured cells.

Author information

1
Department of Agri-Food Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Piazza Goidanich, 60-47521 Cesena (FC), Italy. francesca.danesi@unibo.it.
2
Food & Health Programme, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK. paul.kroon@ifr.ac.uk.
3
Food & Health Programme, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK. shikha.saha@ifr.ac.uk.
4
Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Via Altura, 3-40139 Bologna (BO), Italy. dario.debiase@unibo.it.
5
Department of Agri-Food Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Piazza Goidanich, 60-47521 Cesena (FC), Italy. filippo.dantuono@unibo.it.
6
Department of Agri-Food Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Piazza Goidanich, 60-47521 Cesena (FC), Italy. alessandra.bordoni@unibo.it.

Abstract

In recent years, the number of scientific papers concerning pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) and its health properties has increased greatly, and there is great potential for the use of bioactive-rich pomegranate extracts as ingredients in functional foods and nutraceuticals. To translate this potential into effective strategies it is essential to further elucidate the mechanisms of the reported bioactivity. In this study HepG2 cells were supplemented with a pomegranate fruit extract or with the corresponding amount of pure punicalagin, and then subjected to an exogenous oxidative stress. Overall, upon the oxidative stress the gene expression and activity of the main antioxidant enzymes appeared reduced in supplemented cells, which were more prone to the detrimental effects than unsupplemented ones. No differences were detected between cells supplemented with the pomegranate juice or the pure punicalagin. Although further studies are needed due to the gaps existing between in vitro and in vivo studies, our results suggest caution in the administration of high concentrations of nutraceutical molecules, particularly when they are administered in concentrated form.

PMID:
25350111
PMCID:
PMC4264122
DOI:
10.3390/ijms151119458
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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