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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Oct 27;11(11):11121-31. doi: 10.3390/ijerph111111121.

Radon concentrations in drinking water in Beijing City, China and contribution to radiation dose.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Emergency, National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100088, China. wuyunyun-001@163.com.
2
Institute for Radiological Protection, Beijing Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100013, China. myz0905@126.com.
3
Key Laboratory of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Emergency, National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100088, China. hxcuicn@163.com.
4
Key Laboratory of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Emergency, National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100088, China. jxliu@163.com.
5
Institute for Radiological Protection, Beijing Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100013, China. sunyr_cdc@163.com.
6
Key Laboratory of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Emergency, National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100088, China. shangbing66@163.com.
7
Key Laboratory of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Emergency, National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100088, China. suxu@nirp.cn.

Abstract

(222)Rn concentrations in drinking water samples from Beijing City, China, were determined based on a simple method for the continuous monitoring of radon using a radon-in-air monitor coupled to an air-water exchanger. A total of 89 water samples were sampled and analyzed for their (222)Rn content. The observed radon levels ranged from detection limit up to 49 Bq/L. The calculated arithmetic and geometric means of radon concentrations in all measured samples were equal to 5.87 and 4.63 Bq/L, respectively. The average annual effective dose from ingestion of radon in drinking water was 2.78 μSv, and that of inhalation of water-borne radon was 28.5 μSv. It is concluded that it is not the ingestion of waterborne radon, but inhalation of the radon escaping from water that is a substantial part of the radiological hazard. Radon in water is a big concern for public health, especially for consumers who directly use well water with very high radon concentration.

PMID:
25350007
PMCID:
PMC4245603
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph111111121
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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